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Old February 8th, 2010, 11:30 AM   #21
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Perhaps the British thought that, but the rest of the world thought they were on the wane. Took quite a while to sink in!
Why do we speak English? That's probably the greatest influence of all time.
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Old February 8th, 2010, 12:38 PM   #22
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Why do we speak English? That's probably the greatest influence of all time.
Yes but "English" is a bunch of languages. So long as you respect the differences (like my co-workers saying holiday instead of vacation to Brits that shop at our store) it's not a major issue but the moment to stick 100% to your version and they stick to their's you might as well be talking gibberish to each other.

Hell even in America that's true. I remember I moved from Florida to Pennsylvania and used a popular slang word and all I got from others was, "What?"
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Old February 8th, 2010, 02:22 PM   #23
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Why do we speak English? That's probably the greatest influence of all time.
All of it is due to historic influence, along once upon a time lines when English everywhere was pucker English. You may have noticed that English in England is not equal to English in the rest of the world any longer. Or the other way round?
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Old February 8th, 2010, 02:23 PM   #24
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All of it is due to historic influence, along once upon a time lines when English everywhere was pucker English. You may have noticed that English in England is not equal to English in the rest of the world any longer. Or the other way round?
I just said that...
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Old February 8th, 2010, 02:36 PM   #25
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I just said that...
Maybe one part of it. What I was trying to say is that while England had a large influence on the colonies, English was King's English. As England's influence started to wane, English changed into something completely different everywhere. Initially they were "dialects", but have now become legitimate in their own right. North Americans for example in general prefer Webster's dictionary to Oxford.
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Old February 8th, 2010, 07:24 PM   #26
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Yes, but English is different in as a language in England too, for me it's not always so easy to catch what people up in northern England are actually saying. But it's all English. British, American, Australian, Jamaican, whatever sort of English we're speaking, it's a consequence of the British influence around the world.
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Old February 8th, 2010, 08:24 PM   #27
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Yes, but English is different in as a language in England too, for me it's not always so easy to catch what people up in northern England are actually saying. But it's all English. British, American, Australian, Jamaican, whatever sort of English we're speaking, it's a consequence of the British influence around the world.
By that logic, Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, ect. are all Latin.
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Old February 8th, 2010, 08:53 PM   #28
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By that logic, Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, ect. are all Latin.
No, they're different languages in the Latin family. Just like English is in the Germanic family.
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Old February 8th, 2010, 10:10 PM   #29
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Yes, but English is different in as a language in England too, for me it's not always so easy to catch what people up in northern England are actually saying. But it's all English. British, American, Australian, Jamaican, whatever sort of English we're speaking, it's a consequence of the British influence around the world.
The differences in English language in different parts of England were already there when England's international influence was at its highest. I still believe English is not equal. Even in England from the beginning of time language is almost symbolic of the differences between a Scots man, a Welsh man and an Irish man.
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Old February 9th, 2010, 12:05 AM   #30
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No, they're different languages in the Latin family. Just like English is in the Germanic family.
And try talking to a Jamaican with American English while they use Jamaican English. The difference is so great, most Americans would answer the question, "What language do Jamaican speak?" with, "Jamaican."!
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Old February 9th, 2010, 01:50 PM   #31
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The differences in English language in different parts of England were already there when England's international influence was at its highest. I still believe English is not equal. Even in England from the beginning of time language is almost symbolic of the differences between a Scots man, a Welsh man and an Irish man.
The Scots and Irish had different cultural and linguistic influences.
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Old February 9th, 2010, 02:26 PM   #32
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The Scots and Irish had different cultural and linguistic influences.
Agreed. From the beginning of time.
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Old February 9th, 2010, 02:29 PM   #33
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Agreed. From the beginning of time.
Well... okay, let's not get pedantic.

But a good way to describe it is that they were invaded by different people.

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Old February 10th, 2010, 09:32 AM   #34
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The differences in English language in different parts of England were already there when England's international influence was at its highest. I still believe English is not equal. Even in England from the beginning of time language is almost symbolic of the differences between a Scots man, a Welsh man and an Irish man.
Of course, but it's a part of the same language. Spoken differently. It's not something new, this is something you find in most countries.

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And try talking to a Jamaican with American English while they use Jamaican English. The difference is so great, most Americans would answer the question, "What language do Jamaican speak?" with, "Jamaican."!
But it's still English. You can find the same issues with Spanish, Portuguese, French and German. There's difference between the Spanish in Spain and the Spanish in Mexico as an example, but it's still the same language.
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Old February 10th, 2010, 09:37 AM   #35
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Of course, but it's a part of the same language. Spoken differently. It's not something new, this is something you find in most countries.



But it's still English. You can find the same issues with Spanish, Portuguese, French and German. There's difference between the Spanish in Spain and the Spanish in Mexico as an example, but it's still the same language.
"The difference between a dialect and a language is an army and a navy." They're different languages that, due to a united culture, aren't considered as such. If you can't understand the other person, you're speaking a different language.
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Old February 10th, 2010, 09:47 AM   #36
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"The difference between a dialect and a language is an army and a navy." They're different languages that, due to a united culture, aren't considered as such. If you can't understand the other person, you're speaking a different language.
a body of words and the systems for their use common to a people who are of the same community or nation, the same geographical area, or the same cultural tradition

Do people in the UK and Jamaica share cultural tradition? Yes!
Do they speak the same language? Yes!
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Old February 10th, 2010, 10:12 AM   #37
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a body of words and the systems for their use common to a people who are of the same community or nation, the same geographical area, or the same cultural tradition

Do people in the UK and Jamaica share cultural tradition? Yes!
Do they speak the same language? Yes!
Do people in Spain and Italy share cultural tradition? Yes!
Do they speak the same language? Yes... Oh wait.
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Old February 10th, 2010, 10:15 AM   #38
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Do people in Spain and Italy share cultural tradition? Yes!
Do they speak the same language? Yes... Oh wait.
Not the same thing. Italy and Spain never had a tradition for speaking the same language, they're a part of the same language family. So is English and German.
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Old February 10th, 2010, 10:27 AM   #39
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Not the same thing. Italy and Spain never had a tradition for speaking the same language, they're a part of the same language family. So is English and German.
Spanish started out as a dialect of Latin. It wasn't until after the Fall that it was considered a different language, "army and navy".
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Old February 10th, 2010, 12:42 PM   #40
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Spanish started out as a dialect of Latin. It wasn't until after the Fall that it was considered a different language, "army and navy".
And now today it's an official language spoken in Spain and in Latin America. And it's part of the Latin language family, same with Italian and French. English and German are two examples of two Germanic languages.
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