Current Pre-Winter Severe Wintry Weather Preview of Coming Ice Age

Dec 2018
1,249
26
Tempe, AZ
#1
FEWER and fewer sunspots are appearing on the Sun as ball of fire prepares to go into a solar minimum which could lead to a mini Ice Age.

https://www.express.co.uk/news/scie...eather-forecast-sunspot-solar-minimum-maximum

The Sun follows cycles of roughly 11 years where it reaches a solar maximum and then a solar minimum.
The last time there was a prolonged solar minimum, it led to a ‘mini ice-age’, scientifically known as the Maunder minimum - which lasted for 70 years.
During a solar maximum, the Sun gives off more heat and is littered with sunspots. The sun gives off less heat in a solar minimum due to a decrease in magnetic waves.
Currently, we are in the solar maximum, but in 2021 or sooner, the temperatures given off from the Sun will begin dropping as we enter the solar minimum.

This year, scientists have noticed that there are 60 percent fewer sunspots than the same period in 2017 as the Sun prepares to enter the cooler cycle.
SpaceWeather.com says sunspots are “vanishing faster than usual” and warns there have been “whole weeks going by without sunspots”.
The website continues: “The fact that sunspots are vanishing comes as no surprise. Forecasters have been saying for years that this would happen as the current solar cycle (‘solar cycle 24’) comes to an end. The surprise is how fast.”
The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) said: "Solar cycle 24 is declining more quickly than foreca
 
Dec 2018
1,249
26
Tempe, AZ
#4
Instead of walking on wet water -- wet from the standpoint of water -- you can tread on (cold) thin ice -- cold from the standpoint of ice. :)
No treading need from the standpoint of thick, thick ice to to the massive drops in worldwide temperatures.
 
Jun 2013
1,053
33
Earth
#5
No treading need from the standpoint of thick, thick ice to to the massive drops in worldwide temperatures.
You are really talking with your mouth at your very bottom.

The Arctic ice is melting! Please refer to the following article at the link below.

According to https://www.theguardian.com/world/2018/mar/06/arctic-warmest-winter-record-climate-change

(Begin excerpts)
The Arctic winter has ended with more news that is worrying even the scientists who watch the effects of climate change closely.

The region experienced its warmest winter on record. Sea ice hit record lows for the time of year, new US weather data revealed on Tuesday.

“It’s just crazy, crazy stuff,” said Mark Serreze, director of the National Snow and Ice Data Center in Boulder, Colorado, who has been studying the Arctic since 1982. “These heat waves – I’ve never seen anything like this.”

Experts say what’s happening is unprecedented, part of a global warming-driven cycle that probably played a role in the recent strong, icy storms in Europe and the north-eastern US.

The land weather station closest to the North Pole, at the tip of Greenland, spent more than 60 hours above freezing in February. Before this year, scientists had seen the temperature there rise above freezing in February only twice before, and then extremely briefly. Last month’s record-high temperatures have been more like those typical of May, said Ruth Mottram, a climate scientist at the Danish Meteorological Institute.

Of nearly three dozen different Arctic weather stations, 15 of them were at least 10F (5.6C) above normal for the winter. (End excerpts)
 
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Dec 2018
1,249
26
Tempe, AZ
#6
San Francisco had a VERY rare snow event. Yet another hint of the 2020 (mini) ice age coming to fruition. :eek:

ACTUAL photo:



I am so blessed I live in SOUTH FLORIDA!!! :D:D:D The effects will likely be mild here. Maybe a frost or two each Winter. :cool::cool::cool:

https://abc7news.com/weather/stunning-video-shows-snow-covered-hillsides-around-bay-area/5122539/

San Francisco is in an area of highly diversified topography favorable to numerous microclimates, but the city's location in the middle latitudes and right on the California coast places it in a Mediterranean climate zone characterized by moist mild winters and dry summers. Snowstorms in downtown San Francisco are rare; in fact, during the last 150 years there have been only six documented snowfall events with one inch or more measured in that district. Snow accumulates more frequently and to greater depths on the surrounding hills, but the inner city itself is almost always spared the winter coat of white. (The last time San Francisco's financial district received an inch of snow was December 11, 1932.)

During the second half of the 19th century, colder weather and coastal snowfall events were more common in California than they are today. In the days before the automobile, when urbanites walked or rode the trolley, newspaper accounts rendered a pleasing picture of appreciation for that rare meteorological event, a real San Francisco snowstorm.

On December 30, 1856, a two and a half inch snowfall added to the city's holiday cheer. The Alta California reported; "The oldest inhabitant was about the streets yesterday, freely expressing his opinion that he had never seen such a day before in San Francisco. For several hours together, the white feathery flakes, such as in the Eastern States when they cover the ground with a snowy mantle, bring out the prancing horses and merry faces whose laugh keeps time to the music of the jingling sleigh bells — just such snow, the pure and genuine article, fell yesterday in San Francisco. The thermometer, during the day, fell very low; at one time in the afternoon, it sunk to 36 degrees, an unusual temperature for San Francisco."

Today, most scientists take global warming and climate change very seriously. In 1856, the Alta California editor presciently noted: "Are the seasons changing with the innovations which the Anglo Saxon race has made in California? We shall begin to think so if we continue having snow storms in winter and rains in July."

Several individuals recorded temperature and precipitation in San Francisco before the advent of the U.S. Weather Service, the most noted being Thomas Tennent from Philadelphia. Tennant, who designed nautical and mathematical instruments, began taking daily measurements on August 14, 1849, shortly after his arrival in San Francisco. The Army Signal Service took over observations on March 1, 1871, but due to Tennent's expertise as an instrument maker and the fact that he recorded rainfall to the nearest 100th of an inch, his data were accepted as the "official" early record. (Note: Virtually all of the original 19thcentury California weather records and documents were destroyed in the 1906 quake-fire, but many were later reconstituted by incorporating previously published data from journals and newspapers.)

A snowstorm on January 12, 1868, inspired the Alta California to remark; "Snow covered all the roofs and sidewalks even in the lower part of town, and the hills were for the first time in years completely whitened. The effect produced upon the city was to us in California startlingly beautiful. The velvet coating of the snow on the outlines of roofs, towers, gables and steeples with sharp distinctness, and the hills beyond the Mission Dolores, and so on all around the Bay of San Francisco were as white as the Alps in midwinter. Thus far the winter has been a rough one throughout the State, and it is likely to be long remembered as such by everybody in California."

A MINI ICE AGE APPARENTLY HAPPENED IN THE 1880s as:

During the 1880s, a decade when wintry storms plagued the continental U.S., San Francisco residents experienced four winter seasons with snow; 1882, 1884, 1887, and 1888. On New Years Eve, 1882, steady snow fell for 5 hours, reaching 3.5 inches deep in the downtown area. Large crowds of boys and girls gathered to build snowmen and throw snowballs. Telephone and telegraph service were interrupted because of downed wires, and the flower beds and exotic gardens in Golden Gate Park were damaged by the thick blanket of ice. A two-inch snowfall graced the city on February 7, 1884, but it was hardly noticed by the bustling metropolis. It seemed that the city's residents were getting used to winter snowstorms. But three years later, when half of foot fell, the town went crazy.

San Francisco's all-time record snowfall occurred on February 5, 1887, when 3.7 inches were measured at the downtown weather bureau location in the financial district. At higher elevations in the western portion of the city, the snow was 7 inches deep. The snow depth at California Street and Central Avenue was measured at just over 6 inches. TheSan Francisco Chronicle devoted five full columns to accounts of the historic storm. The newspaper waxed poetically on the bucolic scene; "The first broad flakes came softly down a few minutes before 3 o'clock yesterday morning and settled as lightly as swan's down on the dark earth. People from the East saw again the Christmas of their youth, and the little ones went wild to find that their experience of snow was not to be confined to storybooks."

The Chronicle noted the excitement of little children with the novel appearance of snow: "There was an especial poetry about the joys of the little ones. There was not one who could toddle who did not rush into the streets to romp in the white, and even the sick children were carried to the windows, that they might see how bravely Mother Goose was shaking the feathers down." But it was not total bliss throughout the city. The Chronicle reported "…the street-car men journeyed up and down their lines, running the gauntlet of hundreds of men and boys who did not content themselves with snowballs, but flung hard, sharp ice, and acted as maliciously as fiends. The streetcars were pelted with snowballs without mercy, and much glass was broken. By noon, however, the small boys had been confined to the house to dry his clothes and the trainmen were less annoyed."

The paper also mentioned; "A number of former residents of Albany, New York , made a large toboggan and named it the 'Major Macfarlane,' after the editor of the Albany Press. Yesterday morning Thomas Doolan was elected Captain and Judge Pennie steersman, and a trial run was made down Haight Street hill. This is probably the first toboggan club organized in California, and the members send greetings to the coasting clubs of New York State!"
 
Jun 2013
1,053
33
Earth
#7
You are suffering from TDS. :) Please read the article in the link below:

According to https://www.esquire.com/news-politi...-the-union-climate-change-antarctica-glacier/

Scientists have discovered an enormous void under an Antarctic glacier, sparking concern that the ice sheet is melting faster than anyone had realized — and spotlighting the dire threat posed by rising seas to coastal cities around the world, including New York City and Miami. The cavity under Thwaites Glacier in West Antarctica is about six miles long and 1,000 feet deep — representing the loss of 14 billion tons of ice.
 
Oct 2012
2,321
432
NC
#8
both scenarios could be true. melting ice caps decreases temperature of ocean producing an eventual ice age.
I'm no climate scientist, but I have read of this possible cycle.
 
Dec 2018
1,249
26
Tempe, AZ
#9
both scenarios could be true. melting ice caps decreases temperature of ocean producing an eventual ice age.
I'm no climate scientist, but I have read of this possible cycle.
Yeah, there are so many variables in nature. This is why climate is so very dynamic over centuries & millennia.
 

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