How do you become an Atheist?

Mar 2009
416
0
Philippines
#1
Atheists are people who don't believe in God or any other gods. In short, they are the one who don't have a religion.

Since I have read many posts contradicting(that's what I thought) other religions here, especially Christianism. I really do believe that these people are Atheist. What is your religion when you were born? Where do you really believe? Science? And, when and how did you became an Atheist?
 
Jan 2009
639
2
#2
I wasn't really born into anything. My branch of the family tree has never been too big on organized religion (ironic considering that there are 3 ministers in my family).

I officially became an atheist when I realized that there just didn't seem to be any reason to actually believe in God. There is nothing in this world that can't be attributed to the beauty of one's effort. One also doesn't have to jump through mental hoops to explain the ridiculous amount of suffering that regularly takes place.

What do most of us believe in? Nothing different from most people. The majority pick a favorite philosophy and moral standard. We try to be nice. We realize/believe that there is no God to watch over us, so a number of atheists just focus on doing what they can to improve the world in their own way.
 
Mar 2009
369
1
#3
I don't think anyone becomes an atheist. I think everyone is born an atheist and environmental conditions shape your beliefs. Most born into religious families will likely follow those beliefs... at least until they come to an age where they begin to see things in their own way. Likewise for families without religion.
 
Jan 2013
316
1
Delaware
#4
I don't think anyone becomes an atheist. I think everyone is born an atheist and environmental conditions shape your beliefs. Most born into religious families will likely follow those beliefs... at least until they come to an age where they begin to see things in their own way. Likewise for families without religion.
I agree, there really is no formal way to "become" an atheist. You develop your own views and thoughts on religion until you decide you either that it all makes sense or religion is just ridiculous. It's pretty much something only you can decide.
 
Mar 2009
416
0
Philippines
#5
I agree, there really is no formal way to "become" an atheist. You develop your own views and thoughts on religion until you decide you either that it all makes sense or religion is just ridiculous. It's pretty much something only you can decide.
So I see. There's really no formal way to become an atheist. Many of are saying that you come to think of it when you come at age. So in case you are asked where do the Earth or universe came from? So what will you say to them: it was created by God or because of the Big Bang Theory?
 
Jan 2009
639
2
#6
Well, if they understand the issue, than they'd shrug and say we don't know.

The Big Bang Theory doesn't really talk about the true origin of the universe. The necessary material is already in place. It just explains a bunch of phenomena (quite well actually) and tries to explain the nature of the universe. Even with that theory, there's a point where we just say that we have no idea. I believe it is at 10^-43 seconds after the big bang starts. We physically can't go back anymore, since all we know of physics just falls apart.

So...yeah. Most just say that some force/random chance/unknown incidence created our universe. There's actually evidence for that. Apparently its a really cool thing that's been viewed, even in a vacuum. Sometimes, matter and antimatter just spontaneously "pop" into existence. One theory is that we're just a big bubble that popped out.

The jury is still out though. The origin of life and the origin of the universe are very new fields. We've been working hard to gather up enough background to finally make some headway in both fields. There have been a lot of big discoveries in astronomy and cosmology that are just about 20-40 years old.
 
Mar 2009
369
1
#7
So I see. There's really no formal way to become an atheist. Many of are saying that you come to think of it when you come at age. So in case you are asked where do the Earth or universe came from? So what will you say to them: it was created by God or because of the Big Bang Theory?
I really don't have enough knowledge of the big bang theory to say whether or not I truly believe it as a possibility. Look at it this way: thousands of years ago, man didn't know the science behind lightning or hurricanes, etc, so they attributed them to gods. I'd much rather say: we don't know for sure yet, than to say: god did it. Just because science hasn't proved something yet, doesn't automatically mean it must have been a god.
 
Jan 2009
639
2
#8
More importantly, what would it matter? If God created the universe, then what? It wouldn't change anything, since it seems like a rational person would conclude that God plays little to no role in the universe as it stands today.
 
Mar 2009
369
1
#9
More importantly, what would it matter? If God created the universe, then what? It wouldn't change anything, since it seems like a rational person would conclude that God plays little to no role in the universe as it stands today.
Very true. This is where my line of "atheist" and "agnostic" blur. I mean, we obviously as of now can't "prove" a god but it just seems unfathomable that some giant overseeing being is actually out there. I'd be more inclined to believe aliens seeded this planet with life (then there's still the universe problem, of which I will likely be dead before it is solved).If anything, my views on god would have to be more spiritual, that god is basically energy. To me though, that's just nature, and the equivalent of saying there is no higher power.

As you say, I really don't see it being a personal god. This is where my atheistic views come in. I see 0 proof of such a being and no one can prove otherwise.
 
Mar 2009
422
3
Florida, USA
#10
You asked us to tell you when we became atheists, if something in particular triggered it. And I'm not sure what exactly it was. I never really believed, although I did go through a period where I went to church. The thing that kept me from being a Christian was that I quite simply didn't like god much, and didn't think he was sufficiently godlike. I didn't like that the bible is full of stories about him being a jealous god. I didn't like the way he toyed around with Job, and I didn't like that all the women in the bible were either wives or prostitutes. I really didn't like the idea of a chosen people. God, I decided, wasn't fair or nice.
 
Mar 2009
2,751
6
Undisclosed
#11
As you say, I really don't see it being a personal god. This is where my atheistic views come in. I see 0 proof of such a being and no one can prove otherwise.
Let me give some of my opinion in short form. To believe in God you must accept God on God's terms. God does not have to accept us on our terms. God is not trying to "sell" us a used car.
 
#12
Why should we do that though? I see no reason to accept that God exists.

I could throw in a bunch of things about "Why don't you believe in the Flying Spaghetti Monster" but that would be a bit more disrespectful then I intend to be.
 
Mar 2009
2,751
6
Undisclosed
#13
Why should we do that though? I see no reason to accept that God exists.

I could throw in a bunch of things about "Why don't you believe in the Flying Spaghetti Monster" but that would be a bit more disrespectful then I intend to be.
I never said anyone should accept anything. I just said that is what it takes to "believe" in God. I really don't care if anyone believes in your "Spaghetti Monster or not. And will not be asking anyone why they would believe in such a Monster.:D

Just my opinion, but more non believers seem more concerned with questioning why someone believes, than believers questioning why someone does not.:confused: Like "some" non believers feel they must "save" believers from their ignorance of believing.:D
 
Mar 2009
369
1
#14
Just my opinion, but more non believers seem more concerned with questioning why someone believes, than believers questioning why someone does not.:confused: Like "some" non believers feel they must "save" believers from their ignorance of believing.:D
In my experience, believers are too busy telling non-believers why they should believe to even question why we don't.

"Some" non-believers feel they must save believers from their ignorance of believing, but I have a feel their are far more believers that feel they must save non-believers from not believing.

Non-believers are naturally question driven. Believers simply accept and spread the word. Generalities of course, but on the whole, that's how I see it.
 
Mar 2009
2,751
6
Undisclosed
#15
In my experience, believers are too busy telling non-believers why they should believe to even question why we don't.

"Some" non-believers feel they must save believers from their ignorance of believing, but I have a feel their are far more believers that feel they must save non-believers from not believing.

Non-believers are naturally question driven. Believers simply accept and spread the word. Generalities of course, but on the whole, that's how I see it.
The part I don't get is why anyone that does not believe in whatever the subject cares. If I don't believe in in driving small cars (just pulled this out of the air.) why would I care if you drove a go cart or a Cadillac?:confused: I do think it is wrong for anyone to try to cram their view down the throat of another. Like last night, when I went to bed I never gave a thought about those who don't believe in God.
Maybe I should have.
 
Mar 2009
369
1
#16
The part I don't get is why anyone that does not believe in whatever the subject cares. If I don't believe in in driving small cars (just pulled this out of the air.) why would I care if you drove a go cart or a Cadillac?:confused: I do think it is wrong for anyone to try to cram their view down the throat of another. Like last night, when I went to bed I never gave a thought about those who don't believe in God. Maybe I should have.
Well, I think it mostly has to do with the effects it has on those that don't share the same beliefs. For instance, on your small car belief, I agree, and to the extent that Hummers are a) a waste of fuel, and b) pump out more CO2 into the air than a dozen small cars, then that's why I care.

It's the same reason atheists care about religion. Religion has a huge effect and potential for even larger effects on atheists and non-believers and I don't think anyone could argue that it doesn't.

I think it just depends on how big of a picture you are looking at. Overall, if you're looking at the big picture - then that's why a lot of atheists care (because of the effects religion has on us).

If looking at the small picture, like one on one interactions or forum debates, I think it's different for everyone. For me, I enjoy debating. I also have a genuine interest in why people believe and especially what exactly they believe. I'm sure others have their reasons as well.
 
Mar 2009
2,751
6
Undisclosed
#17
In my daily life I never ask anyone if they believe in God. And very seldom am asked by others. On the other hand, one of my brother-in-laws does not believe in God. He pushes it to the point of getting mad if someone "gives thanks" at a holiday dinner. And has been known to walk out on a table filled with delicious food that his own family worked very hard on.:confused:
 
Mar 2009
369
1
#18
In my daily life I never ask anyone if they believe in God. And very seldom am asked by others. On the other hand, one of my brother-in-laws does not believe in God. He pushes it to the point of getting mad if someone "gives thanks" at a holiday dinner. And has been known to walk out on a table filled with delicious food that his own family worked very hard on.:confused:
To me that's just disrespectful and I'm not sure it can be said for the majority of atheists or even a lot of them. If I'm at dinner with people that give thanks, then I wait until thats done to eat. That's not to say I take part in saying grace or whatever, but I don't make a big deal out of it.

Now if someone were to point a finger at me for not praying along with them, then I might get upset because to me that's as equally disrespectful... thankfully, that hasn't happened.

There's a time and place to debate... save it for after dinner when the drinks are going around :p
 
Mar 2009
416
0
Philippines
#20
Now if someone were to point a finger at me for not praying along with them, then I might get upset because to me that's as equally disrespectful... thankfully, that hasn't happened.
Yeah. We should also respect other people's beliefs and opinions.
We shouldn't force anyone to believe in what we are believing. And a debate not really necessary.
 

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