NASA Backing Off On Water On Mars Conclusion

Nov 2017
3,387
86
FL Treasure Coast & South Central FL
#1
Back in 2011, NASA scientists announced they had spotted compelling evidence that water sometimes still flowed on Mars. Now, researchers are backpedaling on these watery conclusions.

To NASA's credit, the 2011 evidence looked quite convincing. Images captured by the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter — a NASA satellite orbiting Mars — showed telltale dark streaks running down various mountains, valleys, and craters on Mars. They look strikingly similar to features formed on Earth's surface by flowing water.

But, according to a new study in the journal Nature Geoscience, it turns out these dark streaks are made mostly of "granular flow" — sand and perhaps rocks falling downhill — rather than water flowing down valleys during the warmer Martian summers.

Researchers show that water didn't carve these dark flows on Mars
 
Likes: 1 person
Jul 2009
5,702
420
Opa Locka
#3
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As I recall, there is evidence of frozen water at the poles of Mars --- and probably frozen water underground.
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Mars by rights should have a surface atmosphere about what you'd expect at Denver. But it's so cold, it's all in the permafrost. This is why talk of terraforming always involves global warming, you could have a stable H2O/CO2 atmosphere (which would warm the planet further) just by melting the permafrost. No crazy engineering necessary past getting the process kickstarted.
 
Nov 2017
3,387
86
FL Treasure Coast & South Central FL
#4
Mars by rights should have a surface atmosphere about what you'd expect at Denver. But it's so cold, it's all in the permafrost. This is why talk of terraforming always involves global warming, you could have a stable H2O/CO2 atmosphere (which would warm the planet further) just by melting the permafrost. No crazy engineering necessary past getting the process kickstarted.
Nature does what nature wants.
 
Oct 2012
3,915
635
Louisville, Ky
#5
Mars by rights should have a surface atmosphere about what you'd expect at Denver. But it's so cold, it's all in the permafrost. This is why talk of terraforming always involves global warming, you could have a stable H2O/CO2 atmosphere (which would warm the planet further) just by melting the permafrost. No crazy engineering necessary past getting the process kickstarted.
Mars has several issues that prevent stability of an atmosphere, biggest amongst them being the lack of magnetic field which allows lighter elements (oxygen,CO2 etc...) to be stripped away by the solar wind. Until this as well as gravity considerations are tackled any attempt at terraforming will be at best temporary.
Viability of any long term colony will require the incorporation of Lava Tube construction to protect against Cosmic/Solar radiation degrading our DNA and extraction of atmosphere from the soils on a limited basis for habitat vs. planet.
 
Jul 2009
5,702
420
Opa Locka
#6
Mars has several issues that prevent stability of an atmosphere, biggest amongst them being the lack of magnetic field
Let me stop you right there. Venus doesn't have a magnetic field either and is even closer to the sun than Mars. That was an early hypothesis but it's been debunked for years. What happened was the opposite of what happened to Venus, a runaway cooling effect that caused the atmosphere to condense and freeze. How that happened nobody knows yet but solarwinds aren't part of it.
 
Oct 2012
3,915
635
Louisville, Ky
#7
Let me stop you right there. Venus doesn't have a magnetic field either and is even closer to the sun than Mars. That was an early hypothesis but it's been debunked for years. What happened was the opposite of what happened to Venus, a runaway cooling effect that caused the atmosphere to condense and freeze. How that happened nobody knows yet but solarwinds aren't part of it.
If you say so...okay
 

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